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Posting Letters

Posting letters. I love the sound of those two words. It sounds so much more English than “mailing a letter.” I’m a romantic at heart and I love the thought of a postman carrying a satchel filled with postcards from all over the world. It’s sweet to see a package marked fragile hanging out of a mailbox and imagine how excited the homeowner is when they collect their mail at the of the day.

No Junk Mail

Whether that day is rainy or sunny, the goal of the post office is keeping us in touch with one another. We’ve come a long way in the US since the “running pony” delivered to the early colonies. There was no need for zip codes, junk mail didn’t exist and surely Ben Franklin could have kept Hillary’s “mail” secure.

1890 Montrose Post Office

Historic Post Office

007 and I were out driving recently and happened upon a historical marker on a road we travel all the time. We stopped to see what it was and found this precious little post office.

Historic Marker Montrose Post OfficeIt’s been around since 1890. It’s last post delivery was in 1913. When did you last post a letter?

posting letters

Can you imagine a building this small housing all the mail of your neighbors?

dollhouse size post office

It reminds me of the playhouse my sisters and I “kept house” in when we were little. We pretended to teach school, rock babies, and bake pies in our playhouse, but never played “Post Office.”

under the oaks

This sweet little building sits beneath the majestic oaks of Montrose, AL. It was originally constructed on the home property of the postmaster general. At night, she took unclaimed mail to her house, where patrons knocked on the door to collect their mail.

 

historic marker

Mail came to the Eastern Shore by boat from Mobile. This reminds me that there’s not always been a “bayway” or “causeway”. Connection to Mobile and the rest of the world came through this tiny little structure.

1890 Montrose Post OfficeJust in case you’ve forgotten… here’s how to post a letter:

Posting Letters

  • Pick suitable stationary – in my case, the prettier the better.
  • Compose a note to say thanks, thinking of you, send sympathy or happy greetings.
  • Write the recipient’s name and address in the middle of the envelope.
  • Your return address goes either in the top left corner or on the back of the envelope.
  • Place the proper postage in the upper right corner.
  • “Post” your letter by either placing it in your mailbox with the little red flag raised, drop it in a blue mailbox or take it in person to your local post office. Unfortunately, I can’t recommend knocking on your postmaster general’s home door. I’m not thinking that would end well.
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